Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Still time to’ Category

Solent Wight Garlic Bulbs

I love roasted fresh garlic and this seems like reason enough to plant a row or two whilst the ground is not frozen at my allotment. My mate Colin says, “Plant on the shortest day (well only 4 days to go!) and harvest on the longest”. I’m yearning for summer already! You can plant cloves anytime between November and March and I’ve plumped for Solent Wight from the Garlic Farm as it has a great taste, grows happily in our climate and stores well. Prepare your soil well, adding plenty of compost and give your bulbs the sunniest space possible for best results. Be careful as you divide the cloves as any damage may lead to rotting and plant an inch and a half (3-4cms) deep, root down and pointy end up, about 6 inches apart. I’ll feed with Potassium sulphate in February, water well come March, then pray for a bit of sunshine to help it flourish. Here’s hoping……

P.s. Garlic can be grown in pots as well as in the  ground, although bulbs probably won’t grow to such a large size. You’ll  need a pot at least six inches wide and deep, but the bigger the pot, the more bulbs you can grow (and the less watering you’ll have to do!).  Planting bulbs three to four inches (7-10cm) apart, you can fit 3 bulbs into a 6inch (15cm) pot, 6 into an 8inch (20cm) pot and 9 into a 10inch (25cm) pot.

Read Full Post »

Once your summer fruiting raspberry canes have finished fruiting this year, cut back only the old canes that the fruit was on to ground level, leaving the newer canes (maximum 6-8 new stems per plant) to grow for next year’s fruit. The fruited canes and new canes will look quite different: the old stems will be more brittle at the bottom and brown and woody, whereas the new canes will be more supple and a fresher green colour. Cut the old stems from the supports as you cut them away at the base and tie in the new stems in their place. If you have new canes that are growing further away from the supports, dig these out and plant elsewhere or give to friends!

If your raspberry canes haven’t fruited this year, pruning all of the summer fruiting canes either in summer after fruiting or in spring, is probably where your problem lies. You mustn’t prune the newer green canes that grew this year, as these will be the one year old stems that your raspberries will fruit on next year. Hope that makes sense. Don’t prune any canes that grew during this year (and this might be all of your canes if you cut back all of the stems in spring) and you’ll have fruit next year!

Autumn raspberries should be happily supplying fruit right now and up until October or November. These canes can be pruned in February.

Read Full Post »

After dashing around all morning in South London, buying plants for clients, I popped into the delightfully minty Garden of Disorientation in Clerkenwell on my way home to North London.

I forgot to ask Lynne Isham (who supplied the stylish garden furniture, above) why so disorienting, but felt the serene interior was a true antidote to its busy urban exterior in Smithfield Market. Rather than feeling disoriented though, I sank into the calm and cool interior and was further relaxed by a refreshing nonalcoholic tipple. This unexpected space reminded me of my visit last summer to Peter Zumthor’s Pavillion at the Serpentine Gallery, where Londoners were treated to Piet Oudolf’s glorious informal planting after entering Zumthor’s unpromising matt black shed-like structure.

Brainchild of Deborah Nagan, many have collaborated to make this temporary space such an enjoyable venue. Smithfiled butchers delivered unwanted pallets which have been artfully used to house thousands of mint plants (donated by Steve’s leaves) and to give height and structure to this previous meat-packing warehouse. Mike Bekin has supplied heavy-duty flooring, installed by much praised Dan the carpenter and The City of London Corporation have granted a 3 week license to serve up mojitos for weary workers after a hard day’s graft.

Plenty of visitors have enjoyed this thoughtful, quirky space, where the pared back, uncommercial interior echoes the ethos of the Chelsea Fringe itself and the mint filled rooms provide a restful haven, much appreciated as a green pause button in our busy urban lives.

The Garden of Disorientation is open from the 5th-9th of June 11-6pm and until 10pm Wed 6th-Sat 9th June. And there’s still tons of other Chelsea Fringe events on offer, most of which are free, until Sunday June 10th.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,039 other followers

%d bloggers like this: